Why You Are Constantly Hungry

July 9, 2015 8:30 am  |  Comments: 7  | Views: 3011
    

It’s one thing to notice an uptick in appetite if you’ve been training hard at the gym, or if you’re pregnant or PMS-ing. But when you always feel like a bottomless pit for no obvious reason, then something’s definitely up. “Hunger is the physiological need for calories, water, and salt, and it’s driven by a mix of factors, including your diet, appetite hormones, and emotional factors, such as stress,” says Maggie Moon, RD, a Los Angeles-based nutritionist and owner of Everyday Healthy Eating. Figuring out why you can’t stop shoveling it down is important, because excess hunger can tip you off to a physical or mental health issue—and giving in to that need to feed can send your BMI into dangerously unhealthy territory. These 11 things will help explain why your belly’s been growling.

You’re dehydrated

“Mild dehydration is often masked as feelings of hunger, when really your body just needs fluids,” says Alissa Rumsey, RD, spokesperson for the American Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The confusion happens in the hypothalamus, the part of the brain that regulates both appetite and thirst. When dehydration sets in, wires get crossed in the hypothalamus, leading you to grab a bag of chips when you really need a bottle of water. “Prevent it by staying on top of your fluid intake, starting with a glass of water first thing in the morning,” advises Rumsey. “If you feel hungry, and you haven’t drank much that day, try drinking a glass of water and waiting 15 to 20 minutes to see if your hunger subsides.”

You’re a restless sleeper

By the time you wake after a night of poor sleep, two hormones linked to appetite have already begun conspiring against you. “Too little sleep can lead to surging levels of ghrelin, a hormone that stimulates appetite, as well as decreased levels of leptin, a hormone that causes feelings of fullness,” says Rumsey. Lack of shuteye on a regular basis makes you ravenous for another reason. After poor sleep, you’re more likely to have serious fatigue and brain fog. Your system, desperate for a shot of energy, triggers cravings for sugar carbs, even if you’re not actually hungry. Aim for 7 to 8 hours of sleep a night, and you’ll get your energy level and hunger hormones back on track.

You load up on starchy carbs

Ever notice how one doughnut or cookie leaves you unable to resist eating another…until the whole box is just crumbs? That’s your brain on starchy carbs. “Simple carbs, the kind found in sugary, white flour foods like pastries, crackers, and cookies, spike your blood sugar levels quickly, then leave them plunging soon after,” says Moon. That blood sugar plunge causes intense hunger for more sugary carbs, and the cycle continues.” Keep fluctuating blood sugar levels from sending you on a cravings roller coaster by avoiding simple-carb foods as much as possible. Get yourcarb fix with the complex, filling kind that contains lots of fiber. Almonds, apples, chia seeds, and pistachios are healthy options that ward off hunger pangs, suggests Moon.

You’re a stress case

Who hasn’t dealt with a high-pressure workday or relationship rough spot by giving into cravings for a pint of Rocky Road? But stress has a sneakier way of making you voracious. When you’re tense, your system ramps up production of the stress hormones adrenaline and cortisol, says Rumsey. Elevated levels of these hormones trick your system into thinking it’s under attack and needs energy, so your appetite starts raging. Stress also reduces levels of the brain chemical serotonin, and that can make you feel hungry when you aren’t, says Moon. Consider it a case for making it to yoga class more often, or cranking up a soothing playlist on your commute home.

You drink too much alcohol

That pre-dinner cocktail or glass of wine meant to whet your appetite before dinner actually does just that, stimulating a feeling of hunger even if your stomach is full, says Moon. A small study published in the journal Appetite backs this up, finding that people were more likely to consume foods higher in calories after drinking alcohol. And because booze dehydrates you, it can trick you into thinking you need food when your body is really calling for water. Offset the effect by eating before you drink, and make sure to alternate your cocktails with water so you stay hydrated, says Rumsey.

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